Tag Archives: what I do

That Marketing Thing

At the beginning of my Monktoberfest talk on Marketing Your Tech Talent, I said that: “I have occasionally had a marketing title; it has never been a good fit.” This was an overstatement. In the course of my career, I have had several good experiences as part of or working with marketing teams, for example Read More…

At the beginning of my Monktoberfest talk on Marketing Your Tech Talent, I said that: “I have occasionally had a marketing title; it has never been a good fit.” This was an overstatement. In the course of my career, I have had several good experiences as part of or working with marketing teams, for example at Adaptec, starting with: “…my new boss, Dave Ulmer… I told Dave what I’d been doing online (CompuServe, Usenet, answering emailweb pages) and he said: ‘Fine, do more of that.’ And that’s about all the direction he ever gave me. He not only understood the Usenet, he was frequently and visibly out there himself.” (more of this story here)

Even when not been formally part of a marketing organization, many of my tasks and activities could be classified as “marketing”, broadly defined as “communicating the value of a product or service to customers” (wikipedia). Such activities have included:

  • Conferences: Oh, so many conferences, and trade shows. I’ve done everything from booth duty to designing, creating and running events myself (and everything in between), all over the world. I am also occasionally in front of the audience as a speaker.
  • Events and meetups for user groups, communities, and students (which bring in leads, build relationships, and create popular, enduring content).
  • Video: I’ve been filming technical events and talks since 2007, and began live streaming them as well soon after. Videos here (with more being constantly added).
  • Websites from start to finish, bottom to top: strategy; technical / platform decisions; design decisions and management; implementation management; information architecture; design, management and production of content; application design; ongoing content contribution; analytics.
  • I have written and edited all kinds of technical text: articlesbooks, newsletters, blogs, documentation, product descriptions, brochures, conference talk submissions, etc.
  • Front-line customer communications: real-time response to product and PR issues. Channelling market intelligence back to developers and decision makers within companies.
  • Community management, including launching and nurturing user and developer communities. I may have been one of the first people to refer to a company’s users as a community.
  • Training: Yes, training is also marketing.
  • Work with PR teams to develop topics and material, write articles for trade publications.
  • T-shirts.

Just a few recent specific examples, while at Joyent:

So, yeah, I do a bit of marketing.

 

 

OpenZFS Developer Summit

Spent the day filming and streaming this. The full playlist is above, below are links to each individual talk. Matt Ahrens Intro  Platform Panel: illumos (Chris Siden), FreeBSD, Linux (Brian Behlendorf), and OSX (Jurgen) Platform-independent code repository (Matt Ahrens) Storage Tiering (Boris Protopopov) Vendor Panel (all represented companies sharing their work) Community Planning (Karyn Ritter) Read More…

Spent the day filming and streaming this. The full playlist is above, below are links to each individual talk.

 

Video: Marketing Your Tech Talent

Here’s the video from my Monktoberfest talk. Thanks to Stephen O’Grady for the opportunity to speak, Tom Raftery for making a great video, and to everyone there for great conversations before, during, and after. Slides here. Reviews here. See also That Marketing Thing. You might also like: Marketing Your Tech Talent (at OSCON) That Marketing Read More…

Here’s the video from my Monktoberfest talk. Thanks to Stephen O’Grady for the opportunity to speak, Tom Raftery for making a great video, and to everyone there for great conversations before, during, and after.

Slides here. Reviews here.

See also That Marketing Thing.

The Perf Book: Getting Started is the Hardest Part

Brendan’s frustrations getting the Systems Performance book started. Spoiler: the book did eventually get started, and finished. You can order the book from InformIT or Amazon. You might also like: What Linux Can Learn from Solaris Performance, and Vice-Versa Systems Performance Book Videos Look What We Got! Why a Systems Performance Book?

Brendan’s frustrations getting the Systems Performance book started.
Spoiler: the book did eventually get started, and finished.

You can order the book from InformIT or Amazon.

Pearson Education (InformIT)

Why a Systems Performance Book?

Using videos to promote books has become standard practice in the last few years, as Brendan Gregg and I were well aware while he was writing his latest. We’ve made many videos together, so we figured it would be easy to film a series of brief videos, say one per chapter, during the writing of Read More…

Using videos to promote books has become standard practice in the last few years, as Brendan Gregg and I were well aware while he was writing his latest. We’ve made many videos together, so we figured it would be easy to film a series of brief videos, say one per chapter, during the writing of this book.

It didn’t quite work out that way, but we got a few, starting with the one above.

ps You can order the book from InformIT or Amazon.