Tag Archives: Mussoorie

Gallery: Woodstock School Baccalaureate Ceremony 2008

The Baccalaureate ceremony of my daughter Rossella’s graduating class. The students wear their national/regional costumes for this event. Ross, logically, wore Italian couture. Yes, one of her classmates is actually a Cossack (I think the uniform was his father’s), who has since attended the London School of Economics. Others in the class are from Afghanistan, Read More…

The Baccalaureate ceremony of my daughter Rossella’s graduating class. The students wear their national/regional costumes for this event. Ross, logically, wore Italian couture. Yes, one of her classmates is actually a Cossack (I think the uniform was his father’s), who has since attended the London School of Economics. Others in the class are from Afghanistan, Bhutan, Nepal, Bangladesh, various parts of India (including Nagaland), Korea, Finland, US, Japan (they arrived late, it took so long to get into their traditional dress!).

Mussoorie Miscellany

So much to write about, but I’ve been so busy with so many things that it’s hard to gather my thoughts into a coherent narrative. So… a few random notes and photos. Life in Mussoorie is a lot more comfortable (and energy-intensive) than it used to be. Room heaters run on gas cylinders are very Read More…

So much to write about, but I’ve been so busy with so many things that it’s hard to gather my thoughts into a coherent narrative. So… a few random notes and photos.

Life in Mussoorie is a lot more comfortable (and energy-intensive) than it used to be. Room heaters run on gas cylinders are very common, though apparently every winter there are dire warnings that there will be a shortage of cylinders, and this year it might even be true. Failing those, there are kerosene heaters and bukharis – wood-burning, cast-iron stoves (above).

There are vehicles everywhere now; it’s easy and cheap to get a taxi almost anywhere in town. I’m out and about far more than I ever was before, because I know that, no matter how far I walk out, I don’t have to walk back unless I want to.

Today Ross and I walked down from Sisters’ Bazaar to Landour. Our first stop was the shoemaker where yesterday I had picked up a pair of made-to-order sandals (to wear in warmer climes): Rs. 250, about 5 euros.

Today we ordered copies of Ross’ beloved Fornarina cowboy boots (the green one in the photo below). Hers will be red with black stars, mine black with red stars. Rs. 2500 (50 euros) each. The originals cost 250 euros.

handmade cowboy boots

Next stop was Inam the tailor, where I dropped off a length of hand-embroidered Kashmiri wool to be made into a salwar-kameez outfit. These are so beautiful and practical in winter (at least in places that don’t have much heating) – and will definitely turn heads in Lecco!

Then we stopped at the dosa shop – the same old one that was so popular in my student days. Ross wasn’t sure she liked dosa (a thin, griddle-fried bread made from rice flour), but soon decided that she did. This was my masala dosawith wonderful tomato and coconut chutneys, and a side of sambar:

<dosa

Mussoorie is still full of unintentionally funny signs:

funny Indian sign

I had to think about “attechies”.

India Vlog 2005: July 31

Ross, Sharon and I went to the “buzz” (local bazaar). On the way down Mullingar Hill (photo above), we stopped by the tailor, who told us that the shawl we had bought for Ross’ jacket wasn’t enough material to make a jacket with a hood. We took a snippet of the shawl to try to Read More…

Ross, Sharon and I went to the “buzz” (local bazaar). On the way down Mullingar Hill (photo above), we stopped by the tailor, who told us that the shawl we had bought for Ross’ jacket wasn’t enough material to make a jacket with a hood. We took a snippet of the shawl to try to match it with some plain black wool, but eventually ended up buying another shawl, plain black (no embroidery) but a close match in color and texture. Vinod’s shop is still at the bottom of the Landour Clock Tower, though Sharon tells me he’s seldom open. He was that day, so we spent a happy hour browsing among reproductions of antiques and even a few real ones. My favorite item was this beautiful crockery water filter; I would have bought it if I could have thought of a safe and inexpensive way to get it home.

The “world famous sex specialist” still has his hoarding next door, as he has for over 30 years, though I’ve never actually seen these doors open. Maybe it’s just meant to function as a billboard.

photos by Ross

Bob Alter Book Presentation

Presentation of Bob Alter’s book Water for Pabolee: Stories about People and Development in the Himalayas. You might also like: Mussoorie 2002 Woodstock School History Resources Woodstock School Meta-History Woodstock Scenes 2002

Presentation of Bob Alter’s book Water for Pabolee: Stories about People and Development in the Himalayas.